Drugs Collection – Ayahuasca – Jungle Trip


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The Drugs Collection - a series of educative and entertaining info dvd's

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Ayahuasca - Jungle Trip

Ayahuasca, the ancient amazonian psychoactive brew Shamans have used for centuries as a holy sacrament, possesses the power to cure all illnesses and ailments including HIV Aids. Jungle Trip is another brilliant documentary on Ayahuasca Shamanism, the largest psychedelic religion in our world today. ... Lost in the heart of the Peruvian Amazon, there is a vine that is said to talk to humans, giving an understanding to the secrets of life.
Scientific analysis isolated the main chemicals responsible for the hallucinogenic properties of Ayahuasca. In 1923, Fischer analyzed the B. caapi vine and isolated a compound he named telepathine (from the telepathic powers one reportedly gains when under the influence of ayahuasca). It was not until 1969 that a full chemical analysis was carried out (Shultes & Hoffman, 1992), and the compound was actually found contain three active molecules - harmine, harmiline, and d-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroharmine. Harmine and harmiline were shown to be the primary molecules of the B. caapi vine responsible for the altered state of the ayahuasca drinker; however, these chemicals alone could not account for the intense visions and experiences of ayahuasca.
The beta-carboline chemicals like harmine found in the B. caapi vine can be psychedelic, but only in toxic doses (McKenna, 1993). Further research revealed P. viridis (chakruna) as a common admixture to ayahuasca. Assays showed this plant to contain small but significant amounts of the potent hallucinogen DMT or N, N- dimethyltryptamine. However, DMT is rendered in active when taken orally. How does the DMT in chakruna get into the blood when drinking ayahuasca? In the presence of the harmine (found in the B. caapi vine), DMT from the P. viridis plant becomes orally active in the body. Harmine alkaloids inhibit enzymes in the stomach that normally destroy DMT. In other words, the B. caapi vine allows the hallucinogen DMT to make its way to the brain to help induce hallucinations (Turner, 1994). Of the thousands of plants in the Amazon rain forest, only these two types of plants when combined and drank will allow the user to experience a slow, sustained release of DMT and the resulting hallucinations.


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